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Attached Video for Tundra 2022 Engine Design!

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Topic starter

hi Scotty,

today Toyota explained the design for the new engine for Toyota Tundra 2022. What you think about it? 

This topic was modified 4 days ago by Ahmad Tarik
2 Answers
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No way will that turbocharged V6 last as long as the old V8 and it will cost a fortune to fix when it breaks down. The reason for this change is not market demand, but the increasingly unrealistic demands of governments in their ongoing, senseless war against ManBearPig. These engines will be "light years ahead" of the V8 on their way to the junkyard.

Basically you maintain it and drive it for x number of miles until something expensive goes 'BOOM'. And as you said off to the junkyard.

Can you guys provide more technical clarification about the design specifications and potential technical issues? What is the different between this design company to the F150 V6 3.5 Ecoboost engine?

For starters consider how much those turbochargers will cost to replace when they fail. (Turbochargers are a wear item.)

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The technology being used is impressive, no doubt about it.  

From my perspective, this translates into 'can I afford it when it breaks after the warranty expires' due to the computer management and complexity of the design.

DIY is starting to go away with these new engine designs. 

Can you guys provide more technical clarification about the design specifications and potential technical issues? What is the different between this design company to the F150 V6 3.5 Ecoboost engine?

From what I've seen from Ford's entire Ecoboost line of engines, Toyota's engineering should be far more reliable. We can do a comparison between the two engines specs, boost pressures, etc. however I don't think that would give us reliable estimates for future reliability. A good estimate would require polymer mixtures used, the metallurgical compositions used for the engine components etc. How hard are the bearing surfaces, how many engine cycles were actually tested etc. I don't know how a consumer could access that information. I believe that would be proprietary information a manufacturer would not offer to the public. Strictly from a consumer's point of view, and based on past engine performance and reliability, Toyota should get the nod for reliability. Personally, I would be patient and wait 2-3 years and see how the new engine holds up.

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