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I need a toy V8 car

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Hey all.....Im itching for a toy car with a V8. Obviously Im considering the big 3 (Camaro, Charger and Mustang).

Any other models I might be overlooking that are of decent quality? Which would you guys choose? Im certainly open 

to suggestions and advice in regards to quality of each. Thanks so much.

 

Nick 

9 Answers
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I wouldn't buy any of the three. Lease, sure. But purchase no.

I would rank them in this order:

 

1. Challenger/Charger

2. Camaro

3. Mustang

 

After my debacles with Ford and the issues I had with my 2018 - 2019 Mustang GT's, you couldn't pay me to own one.

Quality is poor on all three options though, so be aware of that going in. Also, resale is EXTREMELY poor on the Charger in particular.

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Topic starter

Also meant to add....I prefer a naturally aspirated engine. I care nothing for superchargers or turbo chargers.

 

Nick

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I would avoid all 3 of those if you plan to buy.  If you lease and plan to return before the warranty expires, that would be much better especially if you have your mind set on one of those three.  I personally like all 3 (and lean Camaro), but not to own unfortunately.  If you want to buy a “toy V8” then look at a used Lexus RC F.

Also see below:

https://carkiller.com/scottykilmer/qa/muscle-reliability/

https://carkiller.com/scottykilmer/qa/best-modern-automatic-american-muscle-v6-vs-v8/

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Leasing or buying? New or Used?

It depends on what you want. If you're leasing I would also add the Chrysler 300 V8 to the list - those are fun and luxurious. But any of those cars would be good enough for a lease term to have some fun with. 

If you're buying I would stick to a Mustang or Camaro with the V8. Go for a test drive and see what you like. I love Chargers and Challengers but they just don't hold their value very well and don't have as good build quality. 

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I would go Mustang, personally. Up until 2020, they had the best quality of those three cars. Ford seems to have fallen off a cliff lately since they partnered with GM on that 10-speed and botched their redesign of the Coyote V8. The question would be, did the previous owners beat the heck out of the car before you.

 

For a different angle, maybe consider getting an old classic car with a V8? I'm restoring a 1979 Pontiac Catalina with a 301 2-barrel V8 I bought for cheap and I absolutely love the sound and feel of that old school motor. It's the lower tier V8 they put in the Firebird that year and it's fun to drive, even in the massive 4-door boat of a car. Finding a car that doesn't have massive collector value will really help you out if you feel like toying with that route. 

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Lexus SC400 (though I'd go for the one with the 6 and "Supra" it.

https://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/all-cars/lexus/sc-400/laurel-md-20707?dma=&searchRadius=0&isNewSearch=true&marketExtension=include&showAccelerateBanner=false&sortBy=relevance&numRecords=25

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If you’re looking for pure fun and the rumble of a V8, get a Challenger. If you want something a bit less but with a lot better reliability, get the Mustang GT. The normal Mustang doesn’t have a V6 anymore also instead it has a little turbo 2.3 i4 that’s found in the Lincoln Corsair so only get the GT if you want a Mustang 

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GTO (old)

GTO (new) maybe

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You didn't mention how old you would go to find a V8 car.  It seems the common denominator of problems with cars is the newer models.  Cars of the last decade, 2000 to 2010 still have technology of fuel injection, anti-lock brakes and air bags but don't have standard features of cylinder deactivation, direct injection, or a lot of safety gizmos like lane departure alert, auto emergency braking, self parking, adaptive cruise, or blindspot warning.

Information of cars built before 2011 should be plentiful and show proven track records of positive or negative trends of problems.  Diagnostic tools, failed modules and/or parts of older cars generally cost less and repairs can be done by less expensive independent shops.

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